SCULPTURE

ELIZABETH O'KANE

 

Elizabeth O'Kane is a sculptor and painter working in Dublin.  Her sculpture work is figurative and follows the realist tradition.  She is especially interested in anatomy, portraiture and movement.

 

 

About the Sculptor

 

Elizabeth O'Kane is a sculptor and painter working in Dublin. Her sculpture work is figurative and follows the realist tradition. She is especially interested in anatomy, portraiture and movement, and in capturing the sitter's personality and expression. She usually works in clay and casts her work in bronze, although she also carves some work in stone.Elizabeth teaches portrait sculpture in her studio.Her paintings are architectural in style. She works mainly in watercolour, painting buildings and cityscapes in great detail, offering depth and perspective.


 

Elizabeth makes work for public, corporate and private collections.She has been awarded several large sculpture commissions, including six foot bronze sculpture of Irish tenor, Count John McCormack, in Dublinís Iveagh Gardens; a life size sculpture of champion Irish greyhound, Mick the Miller (unveiled in January 2011 by An Taoiseach Brian Cowan), in Killeigh, Co. Offaly; and a bronze heron in Jordanstown Loughshore Park, commissioned by Newtownabbey Borough Council.

 

 

She exhibits regularly with the Royal Hibernian and Royal Ulster Academies of Art and with the Society of Portrait Sculptors in England.In 2007 Elizabeth won the Conor/Moran Sculpture Prize at the RHA 2007 Annual Exhibition and was awarded the Oireachtas/CAST Sculpture prize in 2000 at the Oireachtas Annual Exhibition.


 

Originally a translator by profession, as an artist she is mainly self-taught.  She has a first class honours Diploma in the History of European Painting from University College Dublin and has taken part time studies in sculpture at the Florence Academy of Art and at the Pietrasanta Marble School in Italy. Elizabeth has lectured in portrait sculpture at the Institute of Art, Design and Technology in Dun Laoghaire, Dublin, and to the Friends of The National Gallery of Ireland.